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inspire us. i said no, mr. mandela, you inspire us. so there was this unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inaccept raable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today congressman was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions made by mandela and other apartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided non-violence was not enough, they have been so committed to nonviolence, even in the face of incredible brutality, they needed some sort of military response as well. never ended up being the khai part of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how international were those discussions about the importance of non-violence and whether or not it was enough to overthrow governments and to change the world? >> here in america and around the world, there was ongoing discussion about the way of peace, the way of love, the way of non-vi
history continued. on the man who helped change so much. >> there is mr. nelson mandela, a free man taking his first step s. >> it was a long walk. a walk that lasted nearly a century. freedom and human dignity. a walk he ended up taking the whole world on. on behalf of our rainbow nation, i welcome you all. >> nelson mandela towered over. a moral and political strength and profound decency. >> rebirth that can now be realized. so that all of our children may play in the sun. >> mandela was born in 1918 into a royal family, but he grew up under apartheid, the the vicious cycle of segregation by which the white minority ruled south africa. it's hard today to imagine the pure evil of that system. abject poverty for blacks and restrictions on travel, education and employment. whites enjoyed all of the power and riches in this country. his triable name meant troublemaker so perhaps it was his des atindestiny. he became a leading agitator for change as an attorney. he and the african national congress took up armed struggle. >> will tl are many that feel it is useless for us to continue talking
foreign correspondent terry moran on the man who helped change so much. >> there is mr. nelson mandela, mr. nelson mandela, a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> reporter: it was a long walk nelson mandela took, a walk that lasted nearly a century, a walk to freedom and human dignity. a walk he ended up taking the whole world on along with him. >> on behalf of our rainbow nation, i welcome you all. >> reporter: nelson mandela towered over them. a moral and political leader of surpassing strength, implacable determination, and profound decency. >> i am a product of africa. and the long-cherished dream of a rebirth that can now be realized. so that all of our children may play in the sun. >> reporter: mandela was born in 1918 into the royal family of the tembu people, but he grew up under apartheid, the vicious system of racial segregation and oppression by which the white minority ruled south africa. it's hard today to imagine the pure evil of that system. abject poverty for blacks and severe restrictions on travel, education and employment. whites enjoyed all of the
to me, john lewis, i know all about you. i follow you, you inspired us. and i said, no, mr. mandela, you inspired us. so that was just unbelievable relationship between what was happening in america and what would happen in south africa. we would say from time to time, the struggle in birmingham, the struggle in selma is inseparable from the struggle in sharpville. >> one of the reasons i wanted to talk to you today, congressman, was reading about and thinking about and trying to understand the importance of those decisions that was made by mandela and other anc leaders and other antiapartheid leaders after sharpville, when they decided that nonviolence wasn't enough. they had been committed to nonviolence in the way that you have been so overtly committed to nonviolence, throughout your life, throughout those struggles, even in the face of incredible physical brutality, and they decided when they saw those people massacred, they needed some kind of military response as well. never ended up being a key response of their response to apartheid, but they made that hard decision. how interna
his long captainity, mr. mandela left prison with his mind closed to any settling of scores and his heart open to those he had fought against. >> mandela in his fight for equality influenced not just world leaders, but also the people of the world. >> it's been an inspiration for generations growing up. he stood for the civil rights, not just people in south africa but people around the world and his legacy goes on. >> reporter: people here continuing to leave notes. one of them read, thank you for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard here and in other countries as well. michaela? >> very moving indeed. erin mclaughlin, thank you for that. >> the tributes are pouring in from all over the world this morning. president obama had some very, very poignant words to honor the late president of south africa. he actually invoked words that were used at president lincoln's funeral. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and bending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed s
. >> translator: mr. mandela said being deprived of freedom for 27 years of one's life is certainly a tragedy, but it gave him time to think. i think mr. mandela is the kind of person who believes there is a good and a bad side to everything, that nothing is 100% negative. >> reporter: mandela also ueda a necklace sporting the amc colors. she believes his loveable personality is the pillar that kept south africa from descending into chaos and hat d hatred. >> translator: i saw many people who criticized mr. mandela fall in love with him as soon as they met him in person for the first time. i think that's probably how he was able to pull his country together. mandela's charisma has spread well beyond his entourage and touched younger generations, including ueda's son. >> translator: i'd be happy if i can grow into even a fraction of the kind of person mr. mandela was. >> reporter: nelson mandela may have passed away, but his passion for dialogue his indomminable spirit and captivating wisdom are here to stay. mitsuko nishikawa, nhk world, tokyo. >>> violence continues in the central african r
africa. >> we are one country. we are one people. >> one excludes the religious leaders, mr. mandela is the greatest person to have walked the face of the earth in human history. >> reporter: an icon not only for his fellow countrymen -- >> viva mandela! viva! >> reporter: -- but for the entire world. "nelson mandela." >> ladies and gentlemen. >> this is "headliners "headliners & legends" with lester holt. >> he is lauded the world over as a man of peace, a champion for the downtrodden. he suffered at the hands of racism and endured decades in prison only to emerge with his dignity intact, his spirit unbroken freedom fighter, ex-prisoner, nation builder. nelson mandela's legacy serves as a shining example not only for the people of the world today but for generations to come. >> reporter: nelson mandela's life begins far away from the turmoil, struggles and ultimate triumphs that will define his life. here in the transsky province of south africa, 550 miles south of johannesburg, mandela is born on july 18th, 1918. the name he is given will prove in a sense prophetic. >> nelson mande
forth that legacy. >> and you first met mr. mandela right after being released from jail. you were in a room alone with him. tell me about that moment. you're young, 20 and impressionable and looking for your place and 20 years later you would be the ambassador for south africa. what happened in that room? >> really pretty incredible to me and hilarious in retrospect. this was immediately after the ticker tape parade we had and i escorted him into city hall, and next i knew we were alone. i discovered in moments of silence, had a weightiness to him. i was probably staring at him awe struck for ten minutes then a voice said, young man, may i trouble you for a glass of water. he said it with a little slight i am patience and it became clear he probably asked several times but i was so dumb struck by him that my feet were rooted. of course, i hurried and got him water and never ever had such pleasure in providing service to another human being. i just wished i could have done more in his service and for his cause. >> we hear people say that nelson mandela is the moral compass for sout
the u.s. to pose sanctions. let's roll video of mr. mandela. he was africa's former president who helped break the country system of racial discrimination. he died this evening, age 95. south african president jacob zuma announced the death at a somber news conference. people are coming here to the south african embassy to pay tribute to mandela. we are going to hear from a 12-year-old girl. she walked here with her father and here is what she had to say. >> i want to pray for his family, him and all the people that are suffering for his loss. i like to say thank you for him and everything he did for us. >> reporter: back out here live, you can see the south african embassy here, the statue and there is a lot of media here. we are in very tight quarters, which is why my voice is lowered. a lot of folks from the local stations, you have international media showing you how nelson mandela touched lives for civil rights around the world. fellow south africans, you know, nelson mandela brought them together as well. he had been in and out of the hospital for months. in june, he was admitted t
. mandela and mrs. mandela in the flat in london. it was a small apartment. we met and it was extraordinary. i was in the room with living history. i was in the presence of greatness. this man's humility about the combination, there is no question that nelson mandela was a man who embodied what martin luther king jr. talked about in referring to the spirit of the times. here was a man who was out of a sense of directioning history and those around him. a man who didn't presume to be the mouth piece for god. nevertheless spoke for millions of people not only in south africa, but around the world. the courage it took to for give south africa into its future. his love ethic that they spoke about was the predicate for the expansion of opportunity for africans who were black to join with africans who were white and others to forge the future of that nation. what's interesting as many criticize mr. obama here, president obama who was encouraged by him. i was at the white house when the film was screened. i had the opportunity to see barack obama introduce a film about nelson mandela was a bit of
square. mr. mandela's host on that day was the mayor of bedford, councillor carole ellis. sadly, councillor ellis is seriously ill at present, but i know that she is so proud of her own and of bedford's part in mr. mandela's story. between 1986 and 1990, the right honorable gentleman member for bermondsey and old southwark , i and peter pike, the former member for burnley, made three visits to south africa at the invitation of the followers of christ working for a peaceful resolution of the situation there. on our return from our first visit, on june 17, we made joint speeches in a debate here in the house of commons, referring to each other as our honorable friends -- a point duly noted by hansard. we had gone together -- safety in numbers -- at a time when the anc was still banned, the political situation was deteriorating, violence was abroad, and where the isolation of south africa was impacting on the flow of anything but very polarised information. we were able to report back to our respective party leaders on what we found. i had half an hour with an anxious, worried, an
of the congressional black caucus and other circles as they have been noting tonight, lots of concerts in support of mr. mandela, lots of concerts in support of those who said that we should not have any dealings with south africa as long as apartheid was still in place. >> the people for sanctions were on the right side of history because it really did weaken the regime and probably brought them to the bargaining table much quicker. >> in your article, you noted south africa's economic and clinical aspects were intertwined. how so? how did he help to narrow that defined? had growth rates under 1% during the entire apartheid regime. from the time he was a like did until 2008 they were clipping along. that is an astonishing miracle and away. he did that by saying we want free markets. we will not nationalize the minds. we want everyone to be able to sort of compete in our economic system and to take heart. and theyted jobs opened up the labor force. they had a very strong affirmative action program which has worked very well there. they managed to get a lot of people. >> let's talk a little bit about hi
are one of the most humble person i ever met. i will tell you whether mr. mandela arrived today he said to our producer and said what is the subject of today's show? [ applause ] and she said nelson mandela. you are the subject of today's show. and he goes, oh, all right. >> she credits mandela as the inspiration for her school for girls in south africa. our coverage of nelson mandela's life and death continues later this half hour as we hear from mandela's jailer who describes their unusual and long-lasting friendship. you want to keep it here on abc news all morning long. >>> all right. we will turn to other major headlines beginning with something of a reversal by the white house involving the president's uncle who had been facing deportation from the u.s. omar and the president had never met but they said he lived with him three weeks while attending law school. it came after the judge ruled he could stay ignoring a deportationing order two decades ago. >>> libyan government says so far no one claimed responsibility for shooting an american teacher to death as he jogged through the
. your thoughts on nelson mandela. caller: mr. mandela was a man of peace. of forgiveness -- a man forgiveness. a man of inspiration to millions of people around the world. that the truly sad same cannot be said about the man who spoke about earlier today from the white house. noson mandela had divisiveness. he had no enemies. he had -- he did not desire to cause division. barack obama is low. nelson mandela -- host: thank you for your calls. lots of reactions from the former president, george w. bush issuing a statement. -- president obama shortly after the announcement of nelson mandela's death spoke to reporters on his thoughts on the passing of nelson mandela. >> at his trial in 1964, nelson mandela close to statement saying i have fought against white domination. i have fought against black domination. ahave cherished the ideas of democratic and free society in which all persons live together with equal opportunities. it is an ideal which i will hope to live for and to achieve. if needs be, it is an idea for which i'm prepared to die. nelson mandela lived for that ideal, and m
klerk made a historic announcement. >> the government has taken a firm decision to release mr. mandela unconditionally. >> teichner: a moment forever seared into our memory. after more than a quarter century behind bars, nelson mandela stepped into the light. >> amandla! >> teichner: mandela at 71 emerged looking not like a broken prisoner, but like a king. >> he had won. but mandela is famous for his smile, but that smile is not there. and i believe he was deeply aware of the enormous challenge and responsibility that now lay on him. ♪ >> we will reach the goal of liberating the black people of this country within our lifetime. >> teichner: nelson mandela was free, but the fight for freedom was far from over. >> pelley: when we come back, "60 minutes'" bob simon reflects on mandela's journey from prisoner to president. honestly, i'm not looking for five-star treatment. i get times are tight. but it's hard to get any work done like this. then came this baby -- small but with windows and office. it runs my work stuff. ...and i can use apps like flipboard for news, or xbox video to wat
comparisons with mr. mandela. mr. obama often noted privately and publicly that his sacrifices would never compare to mr. mandela's. aide to mr. obama said he was uncomfortable when people drew parallels between them as often as they did. this is from "the new york time times", not "the washington post." i apologize. how fair are those comparisons? they are inevitable and now we're going to continue to read and hear more about them over the next few days and weeks. how fair are they? >> it depends on which mr. mandela you're talking about. >> and which mr. obama you're talking about. >> one of the things that we talk about is mr. mandela as a tremendous humanitarian leader and so on. and he really was. but he was also a politician. and he also had to hold together a coalition, find the way to steer his country forward as the first black representative in that democratically elected government. in that way, they do have a great deal in common. you do see a very nervous and frightened group of white south africans wondering exactly what his presidency meant for them. and in some ways, you sa
us the background of that photo. >> mr. mandela came to the understand to attend the clinton inaugural. he was very close for the clinton family. in fact the clintons visited the mandelas early this year and last year, and when secretary of state clinton visited south africa before she left office, but he wanted to participate. he wanted to know more about how we ran campaigns here. he wanted to be part of the celebration, because he had a great deal of respect. and i was with my friend yolanda caraway to escort him to the inaugural ball. he wanted to see the city. >> former president clinton -- tweeted i'll never forget my friend madeiba, and you can see the love there. david cameron, the prime minister of britain is now speaking. i think we're going to try to fix that audio. once we do, we'll hear david cameron, the british prime minister. he's paying his respects over in london right now once we've fixed that technical problem, we'll hear what he has to say. he's paying his respects. i want to show our viewers some video. february 11th, 1990. right now a very, very special
was given to a meeting with mandela at the hospital, but even then, he was far too frail and mr. obama huddled instead with the family inside this compound. then brought him to the prison. mr. obama referred to mandela by his south african name of endearment. madiba. >> madiba's words give us a compass in a sea of change. >> with mandela's passing, the president said others must now hold his moral compass. >> it falls to us as best we can to form the example that he set. to make decisions guided not by hate, but by love. never discount the difference that one person can make, to strive for a future worthy of his sacrifice. >> president obama will travel to south africa for services for mandela and is expected to be one of many world leaders asked to eulogize the political prisoner who became president. >> colin powell witnessed an historic moment when mandela was sworn in. mandela's leadership that day set his country on a path to unity and inspired the world. the former secretary of state is in washington. general powell, good morning. >> good morning, charlie, how are you? >> remembe
for the memorial service. some other world leaders who plan to attend for mr. mandela are the u.n. secretary-general ban ki-moon, david cameron, prince charles is going. the french president, francois hollande and even the cuban president, as we said he had ties with cuba in the past, raul castro, list goes on and on of dignitaries. >> of course, with president obama and three of his predecessors going to south africa, you can imagine what robin was talking about, and that is security and the kind of complex situation they're dealing with potentially a nightmare. secret service had very little time to prepare for the trip. athena jones is joining us at the white house. we're very much aware of what it takes. there's not a lot of advance work when you have the limited amount of time. air force one expected to touch down what, early tomorrow morning? >> early tomorrow morning. i think about 1:00 a.m., they'll be making a fuel stop on the way. bottom line, these are the kinds of trips that take weeks and months to prepare. this was compressed into a very short time line. the spokesman for the s
but not forgotten. ♪ free free nelson mandela >> mr. nelson mandela will be released. >> good evening. this is nelson mandela's first full day of freedom. >> reporter: released at the age of 72 in 1990. he remained ever vigilant that his country and its freedoms rested in the hands of the people. >> i stand here before you, not as a prophet. but as a humble servant. >> reporter: and for the people of south africa, mandela's release after nearly 30 years of imprisonment ushered in a new era of hope and the end of apartheid. >> today, the majority of south africans, black and white, recognize that apartheid has no future. >> reporter: in 1993, mandela, along with south africa's president, f.w. de klerk, won the nobel peace prize. and in 1994, mandela's dream was realized when black south africans cast their first ballots in a democratic election. and mandela became south africa's first black president. >> we are all south africans. we have had a good fight. but now, this is a time to heal the old wounds and to build a new south africa. >> reporter: after ruling for five years -- >> afri
the president of the south africa, mr. nelson mandela. [applause] >> your majesties, your royal highnesses, distinguished guests, comrades, and friends, today, all of us do, by our presence here, and by our celebrations in other parts of our country and the world confer glory and hope to newborn liberty. out of the experience of an extraordinary human disaster that lasted too long must be born a society of which all humanity will be proud. our daily deeds as ordinary south africans must produce an actual south african reality that will reinforce humanity's belief in justice, strengthen its confidence in the nobility of the human soul, and sustain all our hopes for a glorious life for all. all this we owe both to ourselves and to the peoples of the world who are so well represented here today. to my compatriots, i have no hesitation in saying that each one of us is as intimately attached to the soil of this beautiful country as are the famous jacaranda trees of pretoria and the mimosa trees of the bushveld. each time one of us touches the soil of this land, we feel a sense of personal renew
. he reminded me of my grandfather. had uncanny resemblance. i told him that. i said, mr. mandela, i showed him a picture of my grandfather, he said, we're all brothers. my grandfather had passed away by then. it was just his constant humility. and i think one of the things that i look at the nexus of the anc and naacp our struggle that was continuing in of -- going on in south africa there is a necks us that really made us as brothers and we had such an 'feign tee with him. affinity with him. he meant a lot to me. >> i think we would miss an opportunity if we treated everything that he accomplished, everything he was as something that we look back on. as the past. in fact he left homework for us to do. he left -- not only in south africa but also for us here. how do we relate. the things that we get upset about that we don't speak to people about. the fights we have, look what he forgave. look how he reconciled. the truth of the reconciliation in south africa still one of the most amazing things that's ever happened in the world. to face their accused and do something better. >> he
'll have complete coverage go and through mr. mandela's legacy throughout the program. manus, we have a lot of data. we have tensions easing a touch. we'll go through what nelson mandela gave to the world. what else are we watching today? >> >> the germans have a healthy look at inflation. next year, germany will grow by 1.7%. we go to the unemployment numbers later today. euro/dollar is declining to 1.4616 despite yesterday's e.c.b. move yesterday or lack of movement yesterday and lack of christmas party for the market remains high. the drop has stopped for now. let's put it that way. the u.k. had its longest losing streak since april. down over 2.5% this week. the dax is at a three-week low. continuing a little bit lower despite that upgrade to growth. goldman sachs and deutsche deutsche say the overall relax nation austerity. going to see growth around the world double since 2010. that stepping back from austerity will begin to play into the numbers going into 2014. we wait for unemployment report. the median estimate is for 185,000. now where are we in terms of some of the stock news? p
government, under increasing pressure and isolated in the world, suddenly yielded. >> mr. nelson mandela will be released at the staff prison. >> reporter: it was an amazing moment when mandela walked out of prison. on february 11th, 1990. the world rejoiced. he worked with his former enemy to move toward free elections and the end of apartheid. he and frederik willem de klerk were jointly awarded the nobel peace prize in 1993 and the following year this, the world again looked on in wonder and joy as millions of black south africans lined up to vote for the first time. nelson mandela was elected president in a landslide. >> so help me god. >> reporter: a few months later at his inauguration attended by scores of world leaders, he declared a new era for his beloved country. >> never again shall it be that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another. >> reporter: terry moran, abc news. >> now what happens next is nelson mandela's body has already been moved to the hospital. he will be given a state funeral. not only that, but all of the flags will be at half
gift would come a year later, his release. >> there is mr. nelson mandela, a free man. >> reporter: we recall that promise he made to his children more than two decades earlier. i am certain that one day i will be back home to live in happiness until the end of my days. >> one day back at home until the end of my days, the cherished letters of a father, a husband and a leader and writing at the bottom of every letter, 466, prisoner 466 in the year 1964. >> thank you, david. thinking of those prison years as we know he used everything in his power to keep his dignity, used his charm to win over enemies. he used his charm to win over enemies. we've seen him love to dance, take pride in dressing well. his fellow inmates like to say he refused to be a victim and he taught them the same, taking up gardening inside prison saying it's a metaphor for life, teaching you to nourish life and weed out that which cannot succeed. as we have been saying famously, he loved to laugh. >> when i told one of my friends a few months ago that i wanted to retire, he growled at me. coach, you are retired. if
:00. >>> there is mr. nelson mandela a free man taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> south africa and the world mourns the loss of a hero and an icon. nelson mandela was 95. he spent decades fighting apartheid in his native south africa. >> i'm anne makovec live in the newsroom. as the world remembers mandela, we here in the bay area remember his-historic visit to the east bay and congressional legislation and divesting in south africa. >> reporter: bundle up. it is still cold out here. i'm kiet do. we have a live report. >>> yeah, freezing temperatures again around the bay area. freeze warnings are up. what a chilly day. this is the third day in a row of freezing temperatures showing up outside. some of those numbers dropping off under clear skies this morning into the 20s and 30s. now 23 in santa rosa. 28 in concord. 39 in san francisco. and 30 degrees in livermore. so a very cold start to the day again freeze warnings until 9:00. then clouds roll in in the middle of the day. plan on highs only in the 40s and 50s. this afternoon we could see a little rain. and then tonight, cold
anticipated that mr. mandela must go some time, that we really remain shocked that it has actually come to pass. i think that it's a shock filled with anxiety about life after nelson mandela. and i believe that every south african, wherever they stood in the apartheid years and wherever they've stood for the last 20 years, are absolutely united in their grief for nelson mandela's departure. and every south african are united, i hope, in the understanding that we need to emulate him. we need to live up to the values and the ideals that he had stood for and that we need to find our better selves in order for us to make us a success of south africa. >> is there love -- love for nelson mandela among white south africans as well? >> i think that there is enormous love. i don't think it started out that way. i think that when he was a prisoner, there was this fear of nelson mandela and the fact that after incarcerating him for 27 years, how angry must he be? how bitter will he be? how vengeful will he be? and in a very real way, he was able to surprise them. and slowly but surely, he began to
into south africa, and we went in to have a conversation with mr. mandela. it was a true honor to watch both incredible minds exchanging and talking about both the past and the present. it was a very inspiring moment. you could see in that moment incredible wisdom and at the same time the incredible charm, his smile and laugh that inspired people around the world. >> ambassador gibbs, when you spent time as ambassador to south africa, can you describe how powerful nelson mandela's legend and legacy were were when it came to talking with members of the south african government? >> i think everyone in south africa, from those who knew him personally to those whose lives had been shaped by the legacy he left were so inspired by the example he set. it's a challenge for all of us, and i think the lesson i hope people will take away from his life is that we all can rise above our differences. i think south africa is still working to live up to the incredible example that he set. i think all of us around the world need to live up to that example in a time whether we are divided by political party,
the generation of prisoners who were there with mr. mandela would simply not see a free south africa. and those who were in our 20s at the time, i thought by the time change came in south africa, we would be pretty old and not make a contribution to a democratic south africa. i thought it would be extremely bloody and conflict ridden. and we would inherit a country that would take time to heal and rebuild and just get people together again. i was convinced that it was never going to happen in -- in -- so soon. even by '85 i didn't think it would happen in the lifetime of many, many people who have played a good and leading role in building a democratic south africa. >> and nelson mandela was freed from prison in 1990 as inaugurated as president of south africa in 1994. thank you so much for joining us and reflecting on this important day. our deepest on dole lances to you and everyone in south africa on this huge, huge loss. he went on to become the ceo of the nelson mandela foundation, by the way. >>> joining us later today, i'll be edit sitting down and speaking with former president bill cli
through mr. mandela's mind at this moment. >> reporter: after 27 years in prison nelson mandela walked into freedom, against all odds the leader of rebellion against south africa's white apartheid government became the leader of national unity. mandela's decades long rebellion transformed him from a convicted trader into a freedom fighter and international hero. >> i have fought very firmly against apartheid on the nation. >> reporter: mandela was born into approved family. he support -- into a privileged family. he supported nonviolence to bring about change. he became a lawyer and opened the first south african law firm to defend blacks who were forced from their land, but in 1960 mandela turned militant when 69 black protesters were massacred. >> many use fear, but it is useless and futile for us to continue talking peace and nonviolence. >> reporter: mandela lived up to his tribal name troublemaker repeatedly challenging authority. he was convicted of sabotage and conspiracy to overthrow the government and sentenced to life in prison on south africa's infamous robin island. he wa
. warmly welcomed at the white house. >> mr. mandela, a man who embodies the hopes of millions. >> reporter: it was bill clinton with whom he would develop the closest bond. mandela, now president of south africa, visited the white house during the darkest days of the clinton presidency. he gave his friend a boost. >> our morality does not allow us to desert our friends. >> reporter: this friendship clinton treasures to this day. >> we just hit it off. i just adored him. he was always, you know, he was a true friend. >> reporter: mandela, as an ex-president, met with george w. bush in 2005. but there was no love lost there. mandela was one of bush's harshest critics when it came to iraq. when we talked to bush about the ailing mandela earlier this year, there were no hard feelings. >> he promoted freedom. he was a really great leader. he was smart and capable. and made his mark. >> reporter: obama only met mandela once. ever so briefly as a junior senator. but his connection may be the most profound. it was mandela, he says, who awakened him to the wider world. inspiring him to political ac
president, almost from his arrival, he assumed a kind of command the first time his lawyer visz ited him, mr. mandela greeted them and to their amaizment as my code of honor. the authorities began treating him as a prison elder statesman. >> you have to understand, nelson mandela grew up in a house of royalty, the king in his village or in the village next to his was where he grew up. so he had a royal bearing. and i think he commanded respect. and he knew that. he didn't throw it around but he used it when it was important. so i think that, you know, during his time in prison, he did in fact begin to -- even though he may not have realized that he would ever get out of prison, but he took the steps that were necessary both with his comrades and the younger ones and older ones to be in a position to rule if that time ever came. i think this was the faith that eventually they would succeed that kept them all going. >> i want to hear you talk about the reaction you're seeing coming out of south africa to his passing. is the sense of mourning and sense of south africa losing its father figure a
.org and thrive. >>> there is mr. monodell la, mr. nelson mandela, a freeman taking his first steps into a new south africa. >> extraordinary moment, nelson mandela freed after 27 years in captivity. four years later, the first black president in south africa stepping down after five years. his retirement was busy working for world rights, world peace and working for aids and charity. richard branson joins me. richard, you knew nelson mandela over the course of many years and worked on nonprofits together. his sense of compassion to me is something i always found extraordinary, his ability to not have hate in his heart for those who oppressed not on him but generations of black south africans. >> it was absolutely remarkable, and i think something that other nations should learn by. i mean, 27 years in prison, not just himself but hundreds of black activists, many people like steven b. comb, you know, killed horribly and decide to forgive those people, and they set up truth and reconciliation courts where those people have to come to apologize to the relatives of those people that they might h
want to show you the marquee back in 1990 when nelson mandela visited here. it says, mr. and mrs. a&m, welcome home. we love you. we love you. we love you. over the course of that visit to new york city, 750 people throughout the city saw him and of course, chris, you might remember that. mario cuomo was the governor, dinkins was the mayor and nelson mandela made a big splash here and big impression on new york when he visited here. >> i remember many said they never met anyone like nelson mandela. we'll check back in with you later on. >>> right now we get perspect e perspective, though, nelson mandela devoted himself to humanitarian work. sir richard branson worked with nelson mandela on many projects and helped him form a group called the elders. a very important part for nelson mandela to what should be his legacy. sir richard branson joins us now. thanks for joining us. great to have you on the show. i want to say first, nelson mandela was a personal friend as well as a role model and i am sorry for your loss this morning. but thank you for joining us. >> thank you very much.
by the french president, francois hollande, which will pay to do to nelson mandela. the order has been changed because the head of the south african delegation, the foreign minister, will be speaking, as will the president of the african union commission, who happens to also be south african. mrs. zuma will be talking about nelson mandela. there will be probably a minute of silence. the french president also announcing that he will attend the funeral of nelson mandela in south africa. i have talked to several presidents this morning who all paid tribute to nelson mandela and said there was a need for them to do their best for the toure of africa as a tribute nelson mandela. >> once the leaders get down to business, what exactly is the goal of the summit? >> the goal of the summit, according to the french president, is to make sure that africans can handle their own security, which means better armies, better coordination, better intelligence sharing. this is a tall order because just as leaders are gathering, french troops are being deployed in the central african republic. this shows how much
of them -- not just -- i mean, in one sense, dad, because he was killed early, became an iconic figure. mr. mandela, over time, after he came out of jail, became iconic and once he became the president of the country. >> and he was particularly meaningful in your family. i think in your mom's kitchen -- >> yeah. >> -- there are family pictures, or there had been family pictures and the one non-family member of a photograph in that kitchen was nelson mandela. >> yes, it was actually the night of the -- when they won, when the anc won, my mom went to a party in south africa, and he pulled her up on the stage, and you can see them dancing. great picture. >> very nice. martin luther king iii, thank you so much. appreciate your reflection. safe journey as you contemplate your journey to say your final good-byes to nelson mandela. >>> we'll talk about the latest job numbers. very encouraging in many circles. good news say some with more people going back to work, but is it the temporary fix, or are we seeing the end of a great recession? i'll ask former labor secretary robert reich. he joins us
and soweto. different creeds and colors honoring the same man as father. >> this is a special mass for mr. mandela. >> reporter: tears and keers capturing the love for father as south africans called mandela. the greatest memorial may be the faces, black and white together, parents bring children who will live a life madiba made possible. >> they were born free in south africa. they experience all the fruit. >> reporter: which pride and legacy, there is also lochlts one man has mandela's image on his car and says he hasn't been able to sleep or eat sense he heard the news. >> how can i live without madiba? i'm so sad. >> reporter: the long good bye will continue all week, adding to the legend and legacy of nelson mandela. you know on friday they had a ceremony for nelson mandela, a traditional african one where they closed his eyes. wherever he is, i hope his ears are opened, to hear this, this is what they say would be the greatest memorial for fell nnel mandela, living apart. that's what's going on right now as a buildup to tomorrow t. kind of sendoff and a memorial we haven't seen. 90,
on "jansing and co." back in june about nelson mandela's legacy. in a statement following his death, mrs. evers said, quote, we are all students of mandela for he taught us about faith, perseverance, and devotion to one's ideals. morgan freeman, sydney patiya both portrayed him in films. the long walk to freedom chronicles his life from childhood through his inauguration. it also looks at his relationship with his wife winnie played by naomi harris. and the film's director justin chadwick talked to me about the film. >> we all know mandela the great political leader, the activist, but we don't know him as a young man. as a man who loved cars, tailoring, who is the most amazing lawyer in his early days in the first black lawyer in johannesburg. so we want to explore a mandela that hadn't been seen before that people don't know, that's not in the history books. >> last night prince william and his wife kate attend the uk premiere for that film in london. they along with the rest of the audience found out about his death while the credits were rolling. >> we're just reminded of what an extr
. >> was nelson mandela forceful in that record? >> very much so. he and mr sulu were great leaders. sosulo was a father-figure. they were a different type of figures. >> if sosulo was the father, what would nelson mandela be? >> the elder brother. >> the elder brother, in captivity, relevant but fine. challenging procedure. qualities that helped him become the president of south africa. how will his fellow prisoner remember him? >> i'd say courageous, selfless with tremendous political foresight. prepared to sacrifices everything for the cause of the people, all the oppressed people in this country. he had tremendous forsite not only because of south africa. a caring and compassionate person. he would put his personal confirms in the backburner, when he sees his fellow prisoner. there would be tensions, bankings -- bannings and all that. he never that that interfere with his responsibilities towards us. he went through everything. one characteristic of many that matured while he suffered the years of hardship on the island. they set out to break him. what happened was quite the reverse. on
that was the model of mr nelson and emma. a free man taking his first steps. in two and use of every reception committee trying to get the people. it's a new phone as the nelson mandela is rife with me. delaware awarded the nobel peace prize in nineteen ninety three. oh well the r in nineteen ninety four and downer was sworn in as president after the country's first multi racial elections the nineteen ninety nine he had been due to his trusted friend becky the band was still active until he finally said good byes to the ice in the eye in two thousand and four. i am if i have to form dvds. for the place. to know what this record. in the face numerous fights including the african states. in the life of one of this out. i know all those also who came late. he began hosting the twenty ten football world cup he said that dad built into the red you you you this. with that we do. i do. he said. his health was failing but he still welcome this to some tunes american fans lady michelle obama took in the open. former us president bill clinton but his ninety fourth birthday. in november twenty two of the
&a book, with information from experts on your condition. >>> the morning after nelson mandela's decisive victory in 1994, brian williams was the first american journalist to speak with the new president-elect. brian began by asking president-elect nelson mandela about his predecessor f.w. declerk. >> my relations with mr. declerk are very good. he is one of those south africans i hold in high regard. we have had differences. we have said cruel things against each other. but at the end of the day, we're able to shake hands and to think in the interests of south africa, and he has had an experience which i have not had. and if my organization comes out with a majority in this elections, i will have to depend very much on his support, his experience. >> what happens when nelson mandela has to use force against elements of south africa's black community? are you willing and able to take on the political pressures that will take place? >> i don't expect that the government has succeeding governments would rely on a solution on force. we depend on the people. we depend on persuasion, and i don
to nelson mandela. on board air force one with president and mrs. obama, president george wurks bush and first lady laura bush and former secretary of state hillary clinton. on the way to south africa, they gathered together in the plane's conference room telling their stories that spanned three presidential administrations. president's clinton and carter are traveling separately to johannesburg. the last time these presidents were all together was in april at the opening of the george w. bush presidential library, but this event in a foreign country will mean much greater security concerned. sources involved in planning president clinton's prim to the funeral of israel prime minister rabin, and the funeral of pope john paul ii tells cnn it decrease nerve-racking to depend on a foreign country. >> they do a lot of planning and they're very good at this. the south africans have challenges, in addition to security, logistical challenges. >> reporter: the memorial service will take place in a soccer stadium that holds 90,000 people. more than 90 world leaders are expected to attend. lea
the warmth of mr. obama's performance. he looks good. >> welcome to "cbs this morning saturday," i'm anthony mason. >> and i'm venita meyer. >>> the lighting of the christmas tree became the celebration of the life of nelson mandela. >> senior white house correspondent bill plant joins us with more on that. >> reporter: good morning, well washington has temporarily put aside its usual battles over health care and the budget to pay tribute to nelson mandela. but as you mentioned, there was one annual presidential tradition yesterday, which did not go unobserved. >> three, two, one -- [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: president obama joined by his family pushed the button to bathe the national christmas tree in a warm holiday glow. and later remembered the man he says has been a major inspiration. >> and this year we give a special measure of gratitude for nelson mandela a man who championed that generosity of spirit. in his life he blessed us with tremendous grace and unbelievable courage. and we are all privileged to live in a world touched by his goodne
'll be a state funeral. however, we have information because at that funeral nelson mandela's family and the world will say goodbye to the first nobel peace prize laureate and will be attended by world leaders, the president, mrs. obama, david cameron and his wife. the final details of the state funeral have not properly been worked out. it is reported to be sunday 15th, but it's not guaranteed. that will be the day hes buried in his ancestral home. it's 450 miles since johannesburg. that is the site of the - of three of his children and close family members. it's in a place like this that nelson mandela. madeba, will lie in peace forever. >> that was al jazeera's john terrett reporting. >> delegates from iran, the u.s. and five other world powers are preparing to iron out the details of a deal to monitor iran's nuclear program. talks are set for geneva, focussing on when the talks will be held. diplomats hope a short-term deal will lead to a final settlement, calming fears of a nooek lure bomb. >> as world powers prepare to sit with iran. the door is opened to selling defense system
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